UI/UX for technical communicators is the theme for TC Summer Camp 2017

I sit on the TC Camp board and am sponsoring the Structured Authoring workshop at TC Summer Camp in DC on September 9th.

Every year, we ask what topic people want for the morning workshops. So far only one topic has been in the top of the voting for both the East Coast and the West Coast two years straight:

UI/UX for Technical Communicators

In January, I did a UI/UX post every day on our social media channels. We knew it was hot, but this is the only topic crossing regions for technical communications professionals in 2017.

So we went all out for TC Summer Camp. We talked to two UI/UX professionals.

  1. One comes to us from the University of Maryland iSchool. She’s a computer scientist and, if you were at STC Summit, you saw her on the panel in the closing keynote.
  2. The other comes to us from George Mason University. She’s a professor in the Technical Communications degree program and she’s developing an UI/UX course for techcomm students.

We think it’s going to be a great learning experience.

Tickets are on sale now. The event is on a Saturday. If you’re within driving distance, I can’t recommend it more highly. See the tccamp website to see video of past camps and reviews from attendees.

And see you in September! It’s the best learning experience on two coasts at the most economical price for those of you who want to be the “one who knows” in your departments.

Get your tickets today!

Button, Button, Who’s Got the Button?

Technical writers are starting to pay more attention to UI/UX because documentation is part of the user experience. Technical writers, who explain user interface elements and design how-to documents for user tasks and procedures, know when a design choice will have repercussions. We can recognize when a design choice is similar to one we’ve encountered previously and that we know will result in additional documentation to compensate.

Our experience in writing documents to explain odd, weird, and outside-expectation placements and behaviors gives us insight. We are part of the UX continuum:
Continue reading “Button, Button, Who’s Got the Button?”

Paper or ePub?

Did you know that reading on a kindle or other electronic device isn’t the same to your brain as reading on paper?

Well, as it turns out:

Neuroscience, in fact, has revealed that humans use different parts of the brain when reading from a piece of paper or from a screen. So the more you read on screens, the more your mind shifts towards “non-linear” reading — a practice that involves things like skimming a screen or having your eyes dart around a web page. –pri.org

Continue reading “Paper or ePub?”